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be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this is obviously a very critical role for the administration and for the american people as a whole. with tim geithner, a lot of people have said he is one of the reasons why things are as shaky as they are righ
energy, the same co2 emission. the end of our planet is possible. but there is an enormous chance for us. what they need our products with lower energy consumption. what they need our energy efficient products. who could better develop this than the united states and the europeans, in cooperation together. to combine innovation on climate change with industry and production. that is possible, but only if we are live. therefore i am in favor of a trade agreement. asked what other obstacles there are. a lot of europeans doubting, but i saw better ground here in the united states, in ohio, and i saw for the first time in a swing state, the co2 question played a major role in the election concerning the coal mining question. to avoid any other misunderstanding, i know what it means to close a coal mine for 35,000 inhabitants, most of them employed in the coal mine. when you close down the coal mine, it was an economic disaster. but today, the coal mine is closed down and you have an economically flourishing city. so it is possible to step away from a traditional industrial structure, with pu
place. for seven years i have given 100% of my time, energy, and life to public service. however over the past several months, as my health hasdi tieror ated, my ability to serve the constituents of my district has continued to anyonish. against the recommendations of my doctors, i had hoped and tried to return to washington and continue working on the issues that matter most to the people of the second district. i now know that will not be possible. the constituents of the second district deserve a full-time legislator in washington, something i cannot be for the foreseeable future. my health issues and treatment regimen have become incompatible with service in the house of representatives. therefore it is with great regret that i hereby resign as a member of the united states house of representatives, effective today, in order to focus on restoring my health. during this journey, i have made my share of mistakes. i am aware of the ongoing federal investigation into my activities and am doing my best to address the situation respovensably, cooperate with the investigators and accept
, immigration and drugs. up next, we will turn our attention to the future of energy policy with jack gerard. and then we will become an station program, set to expire in january 2, christine owens will join us to talk about that. first, let me show you the front page of the "washington times." with the two leaders of each party in the senate. mitch mcconnell and harry reid. yesterday, at the two had a little dispute on the floor. they threatened filibuster change and he can to the floor to talk about that. the washington times says they had a rare head-to-head debate on the senate floor. take a look. [video clip] >> we believe that there should be one aspect of it changed and that most of the procedure be a -- simple as that. the american people agree. >> only ones who disagree think this is working well as the republican leader and the republicans in congress. >> up the majority leader will stay on the floor. you did not address that issue. >> but of course -- that statement is untrue and i do not accept that. >> that is the point. what the majority leader is saying is that he will break t
on the moon, neil armstrong, just before 0:00. -- 11:00. next up, a discussion on u.s. energy policy and the energy grid. spotlighthis week's focus on the jeffrey leonard piece on the future of natural gas and the challenges of an aging electrical grid. jeffrey leonard, start with the first half of this equation and explain what you mean when you say that the natural gas boom could be the biggest game changer in global politics and economics in a generation. guest: things have changed so fast in the energy picture in the united states. a few years ago it seemed that we would need to import large amounts from abroad in order to meet our natural gas supply in this country. today there is so much gas available and more projected to become available in this country that it is creating opportunities for electricity generation for gas, creating opportunities for industries to go back to the united states. chemical, fertilizers, adding large amounts of money back into the economy. the energy picture looks a lot different than it did a few years ago. host: this natural gas boom that we have,
about the energy boom. "washington journal" next. host: good morning, it's wednesday, november 21. president obama returns to the white house this afternoon following his tour of asia. secretary clinton is on the ground in the mideast, meeting with israeli, egyptian, and palestinian officials in an effort to bring an end to the ongoing violence in the gaza strip. yesterday's fed chairman ben bernanke issued warnings to u.s. leaders negotiating over the so- called fiscal cliff about the serious financial impact looming on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, i
in the energy sector a without a carbon tax you are not directly getting back.t >> >> i think you can design one such way that does not cause too much harm for american industries that compete with folks abroad. consumption tax is difficult if you try to do a value added tax. there are things you can do to tweak the income-tax to make it look like a value added tax. >> at the end of the day, what you think the tax code will look like when these conversations between the president and speaker john boehner are done? what will look like when they are done? >> i think we will have slightly higher marginal tax rates on some -- at least one high income tax bracket and i think there will be a variety of tax and exclusions and deductions that are scaled back modestly and that's about it. >> it scaled-back means capt. someone, i agree completely. ." >> i think we will see some of those things rolled back. i think the top rate will be in between 39 and 45%. >> we have some common ground among our economists where we will end up. thank you for joining us and thank you all. i appreciate the pedersen foundat
a little bit of energy into this thing and it becomes explosive. it is all energy driven. but the issue really is not that is what the emerging world with its -- whether it is time a court india up with different perspectives. i've seen china and india in 2004, maybe 2003, the trade was maybe $2 billion between the countries. today, i think this is where the chinese prime minister comes to india and we're talking $150 billion on the next verizon. this is without drawing claims. i think what asia is looking for is that we can have correlations within each other. without necessarily being aided to. it is a dangerous game, but all games are dangerous. kissinger credit a lifetime career out of it. [laughter] this is the way it is. military power is a dominant element of strategy will not work. as a background element of strategy, yes, it's essential, important, including for the first time two years ago, the pentagon had a conference i was there in which we discussed india and american cooperation in the pacific. never happened before. it does not mean [indiscernible] we are taking position
dollars. in energy, health care, questions, we routinely use federal dollars. no one really thinks about whether it is an issue or not. that is partially something about a notion of innocent children and partially because we have not had these big efforts to step up to trade these outcome of checks that will work. >> that is dead on. i still remember him being in a meeting very early in the chart your movements. -- charter movement. there was an association to promote choice. there was an argument that broke out about whether quality should be in the mission statement. quality would be the way that those who oppose choice would come down and shut it down. literally. this was a heated hour-long conversation. if you think about that, how you could argue at any time that quality should not always be associated with option, you're always going to lose the argument. why have it? that said, we are about to watch it happen again. this movie plays over and over again. the sector has the opportunity to move ahead and set a benchmark for how you define performance and avoid a backlash. virtual sc
energy. clearly, that is the future. that is the vision we have of an america that has powered itself by clean energy. we need to invest in clean energy to create jobs and make america competitive in the most important, new economic sector. china is doing that. europe is doing that. america must do that. it is doing it as a result of a bill we passed, the american recovery and reinvestment act. we need to continue on that path. currency reforms. under democratic leadership, we pass a bipartisan bill that sought to level the playing field by holding accountable companies that manipulate to gain unfair advantages. we know china is doing that. we know others are doing that. we need to pass legislation that will again send it to the senate a bill which will level the playing field for our manufacturers and our competitors. i am pleased to yield now to my good friend from south carolina, the assistant leader of the house of representatives. >> thank you very much. despite coming up about 44 votes short of to 18, -- 218, to prevent our nation of being devastated, republicans in washington c
of over 300 million people, the american society of civil energies put the quality of you are infrastructure as a d, when we're ranked 24th in overall quality in the world when in 2001 we were number two, we're going to spend less than $53 billion. that's not only weak, it's pathetically weak. mr. garamendi: mr. higgins, thank you so very, very much for bringing this issue in stark terms to our attention. you caught me my attention earlier when we were talking about this, but here on the floor, this is a $1,200 billion program that could create 27 million jobs in the next five years? and those are economic analysis that's been done by the new america foundation? mr. higgins: it has. mr. garamendi: and how do we pay for this again? mr. higgins you spay for it as you pay for transportation improvements at the local, state and federal level. you issue debt to finance the life of the project. mr. gare men tee: the same way we build and own our homes, we borrow money to build that personal infrastructure, our home. mr. -- mr. higgins: that's right. mr. garamendi: the borrowing
? guest: besides health care, you touched on a couple of things. energy independence. high energy costs impact seniors more than any other segment in society. we have said we need to develop our own domestic energy sources. i read recently where the united states will surpass saudi arabia in oil production in a few more years. we have so many energy resources at our disposal, shale energy. fracking up in pennsylvania, new york, north dakota. hydraulic fracking has been around 55 or 60 years, but it has been too expensive. with new technologies, a can and does produce oil and natural gas. we have it would hundred year supply of natural gas. our over dependence on oil resources from unfriendly nations, we call that a clear and present danger to the national security. we think it is a clear and present danger to the economic security. we have to bring down the cost of energy. on top of that, the taxes during the fiscal clef. tax's impact seniors more than any segment. there is a tax called the estate tax. we call it the death tax. a lot of seniors are impacted by that. we are keeping an ey
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we are just getting back. the energy level is probably going to get mellow. we will make that work for us. today's panel is on the question of for-profit and federal education policy. this is a topic that we at aei have been talking about for an extended stretch. in support of the templeton foundation, we have been running the private enterprise projects, trying to think about the opportunities and the challenge. how do make this work for kids in the community's? how do we think about some of the challenges the potential perils? this panel is a close of a series of panels and conversations. we have commissioned a number of pieces that will be coming up as a book this spring. we have the opportunity to work. phones, inose of the was cell turn them off. why this topic? the vast majority of what we do in america k-12 is done by public institutions. it is done by institutions run by states. and a lot of other work including most charter schools are run by nonprofit. then there is a substantial slot of activity that is for profit. they run schools or colle
vacation in five years. it is time to restore my energy. the presidentand i were joking about how bad i looked. i said i thought he looked g reat. >> is it possible you will go into the white house. is i think my future outside the white house. becoming a part of whatyeever happens. >> it is possible you will run it on the outside? >> we need to have a conversation first. >> what is the horizon? >> you will want to see a d inaugural. the >> i do not thing -- we had disucssion with our people. it is lceal healthcare would not have pase d with out that. >> you were the first president since sdr to get 50% of the votwe twice. the country to talk to people. the truth is, the world had changed since 2008. all of those things have changed drastically. i went to see a lot of people and steven spielberg said to me, you have to blow up the 2008 campaign. you are on the the 1965 rolling stones once and then you charge too much for your ticket. it was an interesting way to think about that campaign. i said to the president i need you to promise me it is not going to be 2008 again. he said,
. then a guest to discuss his "washington monthly" article about the energy bill. live on c-span every day at 7:30 a.m. eastern. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grant at saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? he did. i am not going to say grant was the only person who saved the union. but he was the commanding general of the army that put lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia under robert e. lee that ended the war. if anybody one of the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you cannot, but one of the things we do when history is we generalize, we simplify, because history and reality are simply too complicated to get our heads around if we deal with it in its full complexity. so gramm save the union during the civil war. i do contend that grant saved the union during reconstruction as well. >> from obscurity in illinois to a courthouse in appomattox and 1600 pennsylvania avenue, the light of ulysses s. grant, thursday night. part of b
are ready to deal with that. now the challenge of energy security, and that is particularly true for the defense department. the ability of trying to improve our efficiency in moving from one area to another, you have got to be energy of fission, not to mention energy security with regards to larger security issues. we have got to implement this rebalance to the pacific, something i talked about on the trip i just took to the pacific. this is my fourth trip to the pacific to make clear we are going to continue to have a strong force projection in the pacific. it is important to our economic security and our national security to be able to do that in the future. in an edition, at the same time i have got a force deployed in trying to rebalance the pacific, i have got a significant presence in the middle east to deal with the threats in the middle east. i have a significant presence to deal with any potential threat we have to deal with in that region as well, and at the same time, with all of those challenges, we have to be able to take care of our service members and our veterans
clean air and clean water for them. i want jobs where they invent things like new energy sources. yes, i want them to be contributing citizens and pay taxes. i want a safety net for them in case they are disabled. and when they become elderly. and if they get cold in the cold winters of wisconsin. i want my grandchildren to get the american dream. i yield back. >> the gentleman from wisconsin. the gentleman reserve the balance of this time. the gentleman from maryland. >> thank you. i yield one minute to the gentle lady from california. >> thank you for yielding and also for your very bold and effective leadership, mr. van hollen. i rise in strong opposition to this unbalanced debt ceiling bill. this is an unbalanced approach. we know that. we have heard that. furthermore, this debt ceiling bill should have never been an option in terms of having to come to this floor to debate this. we should have, like democratic republican presidents have done in the past, we should have lifted the debt ceiling. rightfully so, many of us are concerned about these discretionary cuts. what are these cut
what we have achieved. when they have doubts about this let me quote the laborhout out energy minister, it means the most expensive deals would have to go being able to reduce the number of people to help get a clearer picture of what is happening and that could only be a good thing. that is the endorsement that i welcome. >> ed miller band. >> the governor promised there should be no rationing on grounds of cost alone. can the prime minister tell us whether he has kept that promise? >> the promise we have pt is that we would increase spending every year under this government and in britain, in england that is happening, in wales there's a massive cuts run by a neighbor. >> mr. speaker, seral thousand fewer nurses with the public supporting and a very specific question about a promise by the secretary, the leader of the house, promise a year ago he promised a year ago that there will be no rationing. this is what the president of the world college of ophthalmologists recently said. he said this. pcs are not falling government guidelines. there restricting access to caract surgery. he g
beyond the obvious of highways and airports, we have to be thinking about our energy infrastructure in this country and whether it serves our economy well. we have already seen thoughtful suggestions on on both sides of the aisle. when it comes to spending and future, we need to be thoughtful about ways to fund infrastructure. many of you saw the article recently in "the washington post." i want to give a belated thanks to the soviets for launching sputnik and schering americans. because of it, there was a program that got me through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our slee
" jack girard talks about gas prices and alternative energy efforts. christine owens discusses unemployment benefits. and after that, dominic chu discusses what wall street investors are doing with their money in advance of the fiscal cliff. "washington journal" live on tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. now, look at the role of private enterprise and public education and what the obama administration approach will be in 2013. this is an hour and 35 minutes. >> welcome. thank you for joining us. we are just getting back. the energy level is probably going to get mellow. we will make that work for us. today's panel is on the question of for-profit and federal education policy. this is a topic that we at aei have been talking about for an extended stretch. in support of the templeton foundation, we have been running the private enterprise projects, trying to think about the opportunities and the challenge. how do make this work for kids in the communities? how do we think about some of those challenges the potential perils? this panel is a close up series of panels and convers
. it is time to restore my energy. the president and i were joking about how bad i looked. it is time to take a vacation. >> what did you say about how he looks? >> i said i thought he looked great. [laughter] >> as a possible you will go into the white house? >> i have done that. i back to work on health care. i think my future is probably outside the white house helping him becoming part of whatever happens to our social movement to advocate for his agenda. >> it is up -- possible you would run about love for america on the outside. >> what we have to do first is have a discussion about what our people want to do. >> what is the horizon for making decisions about that? >> you will see us make decisions by the and not grow. that is natural. that is what we did last time. last time everybody thought we were going to do one thing. i do not think on election day we expect it to do that but we had discussions with our people and ended up doing that. it is clear healthcare would not have passed without that decision. >> the amazing thing the obama campaign has done, you were the first presidentia
available to the energy sector. we have spent to bring that together, we spent more in one year with the oil and gas and energy companies and their industry than we have spent in the entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the vision of high speed rail, the amtrak excela service is one of those alternatives and know it may only achieve the speeds of average of 83 miles per hour, along the n.e.c., surely that is significantly better than the long delays in crawling engagor interstate systems that we have. this committee should continue the role as it always has to facilitate the development of critical infrastructure and the continuation of one of america's greatest assets, and that's passenger rail. i want to thank all the witnesses before the committee today. and i look forward to hearing your testimony about how the reorganization of amtrak can make it an even greater service to the american public. with that i yield back. >> i thank the gentlelady. recognize mrs. napolitano. >> thank you, mr. chairma
jobs in our communities and looking -- i think, for example, energy development, what tolidine energy development. with the vast amount of tribal land in indian country, we had 15% of opportunities within indian country. we need to build the capacity and develop those kinds of ventures that will be helpful. host: colleen in wisconsin, you're on the air. oops, you are no longer on the air. i apologize -- could the producers get off the phone down there so that i can get back on? colleen from wisconsin. caller: can you hear me? host: we are listening. caller: ok. i now reside in the middle of wisconsin, but i was raised in ashland the field area -- the ashland bay field area in the extreme middle part of the state. with the oncoming legislative session, the last session we had a big fight over mining operations that were going to be pushed through that area near pearly, wisconsin, near ashland, wisconsin, which was supposed to produce 10,000 jobs. but the main concern of the indian leadership there was contamination of the brown water -- of the ground water, hunting land. how much do yo
talked about on cbs, nbc, cnn, or any of the networks. he just announced that he can do an energy tax tomorrow and not have broken his word. an energy tax, wacking the middle class. he could raise income taxes on people a year from now. which is why what he wanted to do is kick out the bush rates for those making less $250,000 a year. this is where you talk about the dual mandate. we are talking about marginal tax rates, higher income people and successful small businesses. that raises $400 billion -- there are other taxes, in addition to the rate increases he wants to include. over a decade. he has $800 billion he plans to raise from higher income people. the size of the debt -- if he gets that, in his budget, assuming he gets the tax hike -- he raises $8 trillion in debt over the next decade. having solved less than 10% of the problem, he then comes back and says, now, who is going to pay the $8 trillion? that is the energy tax. which, of course, the treasury department -- carbon in e-mails several thousand -- are the typing it out on carbon paper? you cannot turn the united states
of the department of education, get rid of the department of energy or whatever. no, reform government so it costs less. 100,000 kids in arizona will now have a $5,000 voucher, they can take to a public school, a private school, a parochial school, home school, if they don't spend it -- >> so you're saying -- >> you don't need more money, you need reforms. we've given the post office -- would allowing fedex and u.p.s. to deliver mail make your post office mail get their sooner? >> this is one of the questions on the card. when you leave here very shortly you're going to go to your wednesday meeting. this is a literal meeting of the right wing conspiracy, right? >> about this size. >> this is a weekly meeting that you've had -- >> some of the people from there are here. [laughter] i see you. >> so this is a weekly meeting of what you call the center right coalition. you have similar meetings, 60 of them, in 48 states, around the country. and this is a place where members of congress, people from think tanks, people who generally agree get together to kind of open mike, there's 150 people, sometimes
to energy independence. that is a $200 billion deficit right now. it is a bridge to renewable energy. if we can move to gas, we will get tremendous benefits in terms of a cleaner energy on a way to a renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, this to be transformational for our economy, but we cannot act on these things even though there is a lot of bipartisan agreement. >> let me just try to poke holes in this. if we rolled back time to just before the financial crisis. look at the u.s.. doug holtz-eakin was out there bitching about that already. it's much worse today. if you look at debt in a different way. if you look at private-sector debt -- just forget government debt. private-sector debt was 160% of gdp. despite the myths of the leveraging, today we are back in that same crisis mode. you also have structural corruption and between regulators, financial institutions and other players in the economy and you have a private sector events leading to a government response. my question is why is it never on this list to get the private sector robber control? there is nothin
passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves his time. >> mr. speaker, i reser
and the windfall. we have a path to energy independence. that is a bridge to renewable energy. if we can move to dass, we get tremendous benefits -- if we can move to gas, we can get tremendous and benefits. we have not been able to act on these things. >> let me jump to doug and steve and try to poke holes in this in a second. if we roll back time to just before the financial crisis, doug was out there bitching about already, but it is much worse. we are back to 156% of gdp. you are still in crisis mode. you have a private sector and events that led to a government response and a worsening of debt issues, so my question is why is it never on this list to get the private sector in control? there is nothing here saying we need to bring that down, so it is a question i want to ask you. the question is, if you think about restoring the u.s. economy and the u.s. consumer, i do not know where you get a growth if you leave the private suite where it is now. >> we try to get the transparency on the balance sheets. we have done dodd-frank. that takes care of making sure it does not fall apart. >> no
and thousands of workers are building that. or when you ro bls to make them energy efficient, there's endless amount of workers when angela merkel came over from germany and asked how did you improve your unemployment rate that quickly, she said, "we immediately made a decision to weatherize all the homes in germany." that's energy efficient but also put the employment -- unemployment rate back down to 5%. there is a relationship. >> i tnk maybe people thought "the inconvenient truth" was like that movie or "avatar." do you think there is a b environmental movie that needs to change people's minds? >> i think incon convenient truth was a terrific movie but it is screaming loud for a sequel. it exposed the problem but that's -- has not ever told us what is the solution. that's the next step i think people are waiting for. avenue abtar or inconvenient truth or many other films, i think they're very good because no matter how you put it, whether you are onhe left or the right, as eff said many times, people don't care if you are breathing republican air or democratic air. people just want to bre
cannot refocus and marshaled the energy and priorities of our country to get ahead, so we brought a speaker who is extraordinarily influential and a true inspiration. there is a quotation that says, when it comes to the future there are three types of people. there are those who let it happen. there are those who make it happen and those who wonder what happens. our speaker tonight makes it happen. he is a businessman. he is an attorney. he is a bit of an entrepreneur. that makes him a remarkable. i think what makes an extraordinary is he is a true leader. he was on the d.c. city council and helped start their voucher program. he wrote a book called voices of determination. it is essentially a testament to how kids can be a testament to adults and overcome great aunts and are true inspiration's region a testament to adults about kids. he advises mayors, congressman all across the country on issues of large. he is in the thick of the game and a complete leader on the issue, and you feel his influence across the country. and we are very fortunate to who areple like thehim savvy plea
? thousands and thousands of workers are building that. or when you redo bls to make them energy efficient, there's endless amount of workers. when angela merkel came over from germany and asked how did you improve your unemployment rate that quickly, she said, "we immediately made a decision to weatherize all the homes in germany." that's energy efficient but also put the employment -- unemployment rate back down to 5%. there is a relationship. >> i think maybe people thought "the inconvenient truth" was like that movie or "avatar." do you think there is a big environmental movie that needs to change people's minds? >> i think incon convenient truth was a terrific movie but it is screaming loud for a sequel. it exposed the problem but that's -- has not ever told us what is the solution. that's the next step i think people are waiting for. avenue abtar or inconvenient truth or many other films, i think they're very good because no matter how you put it, whether you are on the left or the right, as eff said many times, people breathing if you are republican air or democratic air. people jus
to it. i think there was a sense like on energy and environment and education that the president had a vision for where america needs to be in this new century where we've got rising competition in china and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to
am not a spy. >> if you were, you could not tell us. >> we spend a lot of time and energy making sure facebook is available. we spend a ton of time on infrastructure and hiring people to make sure that you can get to that news feed. when it comes to governments that shut the internet off, that -- there is not a lot we can do. it is interesting that young people -- i had a friend who spent time in iran wanting young people use technology. one of the things he observed is the way he put it is the average 18-year-old knows every last detail of how bluetooth works on their phone, all the internet and facebook, the ins and outs of twitter, how to change your -- and the setting so someone can message you. every last detail their understood. when he asked them to are you afraid of the government finding it, they would say they do not understand how this stuff works. it was a message that -- in places where people do need an outlet or way of communicating that is not necessarily available in the public domain. it is a completely different animal. >> we have written about this issue on the sec
are a government and you are trying to avoid your national security grid or your energy grid getting hacked, how does that work? guest: the average joe is at his house. i meant to the guy who hacked facebook and stole 100 million passwords. i saw the list of the first million. they were literally all the same. people are still using "password 1234." that is 16 right there. that would eliminate 33% of all of the cyber hacking. let's say you run a medium-size business. i think you need to do training on social engineering vulnerabilities and how people need to be protected. you need hardware and fire walls and things like that. when you get into major corporations, some kind of attack would have tectonic effect. now you need to not just apply the a training -- the training on humans, but you need to ensure public-private partnerships. we need the help of the private sector. the private-sector needs to help the government. this problem is not something that is uniquely government or uniquely private. host: a viewer on twitter says companies give citizens private information to government and milita
and they get new people, ideas, and energy. all of these things are positive aspects of the spoils system, but the downside is that it is an overwhelming task, especially at the beginning of a new administration. there is quality control that is difficult and the lack of continuity at the top of the executive branch is problematic. the number of political appointees has been increasing and has doubled since 1960. there are more programs and agencies, of course, and presidents want more control. the office feel they can't really trust civil servants that might be committed to the previous administration. richard nixon who said that they are dug in establishment terrorism's. he wanted more of his own appointees, but this is a bipartisan thing and each president wants more control. they think having their own appointees is going to help them. the top levels of the government have not changed significantly. departments have increased by about five, but the lower levels have increased considerably. as you can see, there is a lot of over russia there in recent years. i also want to focus on the
that are closed with their communication. i am not a spy. tell us. energy making sure facebook is available. we spend a ton of time on infrastructure and hiring people to make sure that you can get to that news feed. when it comes to governments -- there is not a lot we can do. it is interesting that young people -- i had a friend who people use technology. one of the things he observed is the way he put it is the average 18-year-old knows every last detail of how bluetooth works on their phone, all the internet and facebook, the ins and outs of twitter, how to change your can message you. every last detail their understood. when he asked them to are you afraid of the government finding it, they would say they do not understand how this stuff works. it was a message that -- in places where people do need an outlet or way of communicating that is not necessarily available in the public domain. animal. >> we have written about this issue on the security side. one of the worst things that happened, people log in and the government puts middleware in their password. if you do that that is the issue
have those dreams. i get up every morning, with all the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. remember.nold, you'll you and winnie were traveling acros
listing the entire energy sector. what do each of you think what effect that might have and in particular how might that effect the international coalition that's negotiating with the iranians and also participating in the u.n. security council imposed sanctions? because part of the success i think over the last couple of three years is that there does appear to be greater unity amongst the p-5 plus one about the approach. so how might that affect the dynamics here if congress were to go forward? >> may i have the question? i hope it is wrong but removing the congress and try to block i would say nongovernmental dialogue, you know. it's destructive and harmful approach. catastrophe, i would say, if it's implemented. maybe it's a typical -- >> i think what you said earlier, rolf, was so important about the iraq experience and the madeline albright. you said we sanctioned a country. they sort of do what we want them to do and then someone announces, it doesn't matter what you do because we'll keep the sanctions regardless and the thing falls apart. that's the situation i fear with the u.s.
of what i've been looking for for cease-fire. at the u.n. secretary-general have put energy behind this. egypt is playing a strong role. the visit of secretary clinton will bolster that, and all of us in the e.u. countries also determined to do so. so a lot of effort is being made behind this cease-fire proposal. >> cannot press the foreign cretary to say something more about what the future conversations he had with his fellow e.u. ministers on gaza, and also what conversation she's having with the special representatives of egypt's? >> well, we have the whole e.u. a fair council meeting yesterday, and there were the conclusions published from that, calling and very much in line with what i've said to the house in terms of the need to end rocket attacks on issue but also as a support for a negotiated caesar. so the whole of the e.u. year and spoke together on that yesterday. of course, we also regulate discuss matters with tony blair, e envoy of the quartet to the palestinians. i most recently spoke to him 10 days, nine days ago about this. my colleagues are in constant touch with him,
to their children. he hopes to expand the production tax credit for wind energy. watch the senate live on c- span2. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> you listen to their member, who said the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced, and that the tidal surge was 14. governor christie said the damage was unthinkable. we had fires, hurricane-force wind, massive flooding, deep snow. you look at that and the flooding into the subway systems, the shut-down of the stock exchanges, you get a sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm. yet the networks perform. i have read dozens of stories about how for many consumers, their only link to information or to people with through their smart phone, linking social me and they're smart phone. while there was an impact on cell sites, i think the networks performed really well. my assessment is that some networks did well, some did less well, but we do not have solid information because there are no report requirements of these networks. there is no standard by which we measure the performanc
it is energy, money, time, associated with every component of our educational institution. given this reality, every component has to be evaluated based on what is the return on investment of educational dollars, including football. so how do you do that? you have got to go to the justifications we have been using for a century for football's place with an educational institutions. we have to be honest, the primary justification was to socialize and immigrant workforce. the other part of it is the great industrialists at the turn of the century were introduced to football as a way to train a workforce for the industrial economy. they wanted folks who were physically fit, took directions, were obedient. there was not much room for lofty thinking on the assembly line. have to ask the question, is as a primary justification we are trying to instill in our schools for an industrial economy? we no longer live in an industrial society. and the other justification we have used for years -- and i do believe this justification -- is that football is an educational tool. it builds character, discipline
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